Previous Next Facebook Instagram Twitter Pinterest Back to top
up to and including 18 September 2016

Olafur Eliasson - Notion motion 2016

From 18 June to 18 September this year, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen showed the installation ‘Notion motion’ (2005) by the Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson. Inspired by the laws of nature, particularly the reflection of light on water, he created the installation ‘Notion motion’ especially for the 1500m2 Bodon Gallery.

With the minimum of means but on a grand scale Eliasson has created a captivating presentation in which the viewer is immersed in the space. ‘Notion motion’ continues Eliasson's exploration of vibrations and wave patterns triggered by the viewers of his artworks. The installation consists of three interconnected situations around a central wall that explore the interaction between light and water. The first two situations are created by a wooden walkway running the length of the space, surrounded by a water basin that continues underneath the construction. Raised planks in the walkway function as wave activators, generating ripples in the water when visitors step on them. These are projected onto the surrounding walls, visualizing the movement of the visitors around the gallery space. The third situation focuses on ripples in the pool that are created by a sponge attached to a string, which drops into the pool at regular intervals.

The impressive installation contains 20,562 litres of water, three lamps and is made of 800 duckboard elements.

Seated or standing, as a visitor you are made aware of your own presence and your active role in the artwork. Eliasson’s work stimulates the senses and plays with viewers’ perceptions, challenging and testing them in the installation. Observation is key in the installation; to Eliasson this is more than a question of passively recording static images; it is about movement and active involvement. Olafur Eliasson’s extensive oeuvre is inspired by nature. He has previously incorporated rainbows, sunsets, waterfalls, scent walls and mist in his installations.

Light and water

For Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen Eliasson has developed a large installation in which waves of light are visualized in a monumental way by a continuous interplay between light and water.

Eliasson plays with the concept that a conscious perception carries within it the potential for change. Many of his installations are based on the question: Where in society can we still use our senses to define our surroundings, instead of just being defined by them? The fact that, in Eliasson’s work, a direct relationship emerges between the individual / the visitor and his surroundings, means that the former becomes conscious of the possibilities for changing those surroundings. The surroundings do not play a central part, the individual does.

Olafur Eliasson, ‘Notion motion’, 2005. Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, 2005. Photo: Hans Wilschut
Olafur Eliasson, ‘Notion motion’, 2005. Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, 2005. Photo: Hans Wilschut
Olafur Eliasson, ‘Notion motion’, 2005. Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, 2005. Photo: Hans Wilschut
Olafur Eliasson, ‘Notion motion’, 2005. Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, 2005. Photo: Hans Wilschut
Olafur Eliasson, ‘Notion motion’, 2005. Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, 2005. Photo: Hans Wilschut
Olafur Eliasson, ‘Notion motion’, 2005. Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, 2005. Photo: Hans Wilschut

‘Physical involvement is a thought process too, just as the thought process is related to the physical’

Olafur Eliasson

From the collection of Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen

‘Notion motion’ is one in a series of unforgettable installations made especially for Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen’s Bodon Gallery. It follows Ernesto Neto’s‘Celula Nave’ and Carsten Höller’s ‘Divided Divided’.

It is not the first time that ‘Notion motion’ has been shown. It is part of Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen’s permanent collection and was gifted to the museum in 2005 by the Han Nefkens Foundation, set up by the writer and collector, Han Nefkens. This summer everyone will get their first chance – or perhaps another chance – to be immersed in this fantastic installation.