Works with a Conspicuous Provenance History

On this page you can find works from the collection with a potentially problematic provenance. By publishing these provenances, the museum hopes to gain new information about the ownership histories of these artworks. All objects are also published on the website of Museum Acquisitions from 1933 onwards.

Max Liebermann, Girl writing at a table, inv.no. MB 1959/T 9 (PK)

Girl writing at a table by Max Liebermann, inv.no. MB 1959/T 9 (PK)

This drawing by the Jewish artist Max Liebermann was bought by the museum at an auction organized by Paul Brandt in Amsterdam in 1959, where works from the estate of the Jewish art historian Max J. Friedländer were offered. It is not known how the drawing came into Friedländer’s possession. It seems highly likely that it came into his possession after the passing of Liebermann, who was a friend of Friedländer, for one can find an estate stamp in the lower left corner of the drawing. This stamp was applied to artworks present in the studio of the artist after Liebermann’s death in February 1935 by his widow Martha Liebermann. After Martha Liebermann committed suicide in 1943, the art collection of Liebermann was confiscated by the Nazi’s . Currently there are no indications that this drawing was part of the confiscated estate of Martha Liebermann.


Anonymous, follower of Anthonie van Dyck, A Bishop Kneeling before Saint Peter,c. 1630, inv.no 2757 (OK) 

A Bishop Kneeling before Saint Peter by Anonymous, follower of Anthonie van Dyck, inv.no. 2575 (OK)

The oil sketch 'A Bishop Kneeling before Saint Peter' by a follower of Anthonie van Dyck was part of an estate sale at the Berlin auction house Mandelbaum & Kronthal in 1936 as 'Der thronende St. Marcus […]', then still attributed to Anthonie van Dyck. Subject of the sale was the interior of Bleibtreustreet 17, Charlottenburg, Berlin. It is currently not known who lived at this address at that point in time – except for an annotation that there lived a doctor who was a collector -, and under which circumstances this sale took place. The sketch was also in the possession of the German-Jewish art historian and writer Lothar Brieger-Wasservogel, who very likely acquired it at or just after the aforementioned estate sale. Brieger fled from Berlin to Shanghai in 1938. He returned to Berlin for an academic position in 1947, where he passed away in 1949. It is not known under which circumstances this work left the possession of Brieger. It was auctioned in Paris in 1955, but it is not known who the consignor was. It was auctioned off in Paris again in 1968, after which it came into the possession of the London art dealer P. & D. Colnaghi, who sold it to the museum in 1969.

Honoré Daumier, The Painting-Lovers, 1860-1865, inv.no. 2596 (OK)  

The Painting-Lovers by Honoré Daumier, inv.no. 2597 (OK)

This painting was sold together with' The Free Pardon' (2596 (OK) by the art dealer Jacques Goudstikker to D.G. van Beuningen in April 1939. It entered the collection of the museum with the acquisition of the estate of D.G. van Beuningen in 1958. It is not known from whom or when Goudstikker acquired these paintings. 'The Painting-Lovers' seems to have been in the collection of the German-Jewish banker and art collector Jakob Goldschmidt by 1930 until at least 1937. Goldschmidt lived in Berlin, but felt forced to leave the city early on in the war, taking a part of his art collection with him. He fled the German capital in 1933 and settled in the United States in 1936, where he passed away in 1958. The part of his collection that remained in Berlin was confiscated by the Nazi’s in the 1940s. This painting was not part of this confiscation, though it remains unanswered when and under which circumstances it left the collection of Goldschmidt.

Honoré Daumier, The Free Pardon, 1860-1865, inv.no. 2596 (OK)  

The Free Pardon by Honoré Daumier, inv.no. 2596 (OK)

This painting was sold together with 'The Painting-Lovers' (2597 (OK)) by the art dealer Jacques Goudstikker to D.G. van Beuningen in April 1939. It entered the collection of the museum with the acquisition of the estate of D.G. van Beuningen in 1958. It is not known from whom or when Goudstikker acquired these paintings. 'The Free Pardon' seems to have been in the collection of the German-Jewish banker and art collector Jakob Goldschmidt by 1930 until at least 1937 (possibly 1938). Goldschmidt lived in Berlin, but felt forced to leave the city early on during the war, taking a part of his art collection with him. He fled the German capital in 1933 and settled in the United States in 1936, where he passed away in 1958. The part of his collection that remained in Berlin was confiscated by the Nazi’s in the 1940s. This painting was not part of this confiscation, though it remains unanswered when and under which circumstances it left the collection of Goldschmidt.


Honoré Daumier, Street Scene, c. 1864, inv.no. 2595 (OK) 

Street Scene by Honoré Daumier, inv.no. 2595 (OK)

'Street Scene', painted by Honoré Daumier, was sold to D.G. van Beuningen by the art dealer Jacques Goudstikker in June 1939. It entered the collection of the museum with the acquisition of the estate of D.G. van Beuningen in 1958. It is not known from whom and when Goudstikker acquired the painting. It seems to have been in the collection of the German-Jewish businessman and art collector Otto Blumenfeld in 1926 until a currently unknown date after 1930. Blumenfeld fled from Hamburg to the United Kingdom in 1938, where he passed away in 1975. It is not known when and under which circumstances 'Street Scene' left his collection.

 


L: Anonymous, dish, 1520-1540, inv.no. T 1 (KN&V) 
R: 
Anonymous, dish, 1515-1540, inv.no. T 2 (KN&V) 


L: Anonymous, Giorgio Andreoli, PainterGiorgio Andreoli, dish, inv.no. T 3 (KN&V)

R: Anonymous, dish, 1536, inv.nr. T 4 (KN&V)


L: Francesco Urbini, dish, 1534, 
inv.no. T 5 (KN&V)
R: Anonymous, dish, 1537, inv.no. T 6 (KN&V)


L: Nicola da Urbino, dish, c. 1530, inv.no T 7
 (KN&V)
R: Francesco Xanto Avelli, dish, 1538, inv.no. T 8 (KN&V)


L:
 Francesco Xanto Avelli, dish, 1539, inv.no. T 9 (KN&V)
R:
 Anonymous, dish, 1540-1550, 
inv.no. T 10 (KN&V)


Guido Fontana, dish, c. 1560, inv.no. T 11 (KN&V) 

Eleven maiolica dishes from the collection of Eugen Gutmann, inv.no. T 1 – T 11 (KN&V)

Since 1968, eleven maiolica objects have been in Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen (first as a loan, since 1994 as a donation), which previously were in the collection of the German-Jewish banker Eugen Gutmann (1840-1925).

After his death, the collection remained undivided and was held in joint ownership by his six children, amongst whom his son F.B.E. (Fritz) Gutmann, who managed the collection.

Fritz Gutmann (who was granted Dutch nationality in 1924) resided with his family at the estate Huize Bosbeek near Heemstede, where he also amassed a sizeable art collection of his own. In 1941 and 1942 Fritz Gutmann sold objects from the collection of Eugen Gutmann as well as his own collection to various German dealers, amongst whom Karl Haberstock and Julius Böhler, in order to finance his and his wife’s escape from the Netherlands. In 1943 Fritz Gutmann and his wife were arrested by the Nazi’s. They died in concentration camps.

It is not known if these eleven maiolica objects were the property of the Gutmann heirs or of Fritz Gutmann, and when and how they changed ownership. Extensive provenance research has not brought forth a definite answer as to who owned these pieces during the crucial period of 1933-1945. From 1955 seven, and presumably all dishes were in the possession of Mr. J.W. Frederiks (1889-1962). It is not know where and when Frederiks acquired the objects.

The eleven maiolica objects were donated to the museum as part of the collection Frederiks (1889-1962) in 1994.

The museum is in contact with heirs in regards to presenting the case to the Restitution Committee for binding opinion.

All objects are published on the website of Museum Acquisitions from 1933 onwards.


Master of the Magdalen Legend, The Virgin with the Infant Christ Holding an Apple, c. 1500, inv.no. 2481 (OK)

The Virgin and child by the Master of the Magdalen Legend, inv.no. 2481 (OK)

The painting 'The Virgin and Child with an Apple' by the Master of the Magdalen Legend was put to auction on November 21, 1932 by Galleria Scopinich in Milan (no. 136, as Rogier van der Weyden). In 1937 the work was owned by Dr. Hans Wendland, a German art dealer who is renowned for trading spoliated art during the war period. He was a leading person in transactions between Germany, France and Switzerland. As of 1938, the painting was owned by D.G. van Beuningen, with whose collection it ended up in the museum in 1958. It is not known who bought the painting in 1932 at the auction of Galleria Scopinich in Milan. Neither is known when and from whom Dr. Wendland acquired the work and how Van Beuningen came to possess the painting.


Hans Memling, The Lamentation of Christ, c. 1480, inv.no. 2471 (OK)

The Lamentation of Christ by Hans Memling, inv.no. 2471 (OK)

In 1936, the painting 'The Lamentation of Christby Hans Memling was owned by Arthur Goldschmidt, a Jewish art dealer who had fled from Germany and whose name is associated with the trade in spoliated art. Goldschmidt settled at the Place Vendôme in Paris in 1936, together with Paul Graupe, another art dealer from Berlin. After the occupation of Paris by the Germans in 1940, their commercial inventory was confiscated and Goldschmidt was imprisoned. He was released after six months, after which he travelled via Spain to Havana (Cuba), where he continued his art trade. It is unknown from whom and when Goldschmidt acquired the painting 'The Lamentation of Christ'. At least until 1917, it was owned by Richard von Kaufmann in Berlin. In 1936, the painting was bought from Goldschmidt by D.G. van Beuningen. As a part of his collection, it ended up in the museum in 1958.