Works with a Conspicuous Provenance History

The Virgin and child by the Master of the Magdalen Legend, inv.no. 2481 (OK)

The painting The Virgin and Child with an Apple by the Master of the Magdalen Legend was put to auction on November 21, 1932 by Galleria Scopinich in Milan (no. 136, as Rogier van der Weyden). In 1937 the work was owned by Dr. Hans Wendland, a German art dealer who is renowned for trading spoliated art during the war period. He was a leading person in transactions between Germany, France and Switzerland. As of 1938, the painting was owned by D.G. van Beuningen, with whose collection it ended up in the museum in 1958. It is not known who bought the painting in 1932 at the auction of Galleria Scopinich in Milan. Neither is known when and from whom Dr. Wendland acquired the work and how Van Beuningen came to possess the painting.

L: The Virgin and Child by the Master of the Magdalen Legend, inv.no. 2481 (OK)
R: The Lamentation of Christ by Hans Memling, inv. no. 2471 (OK)

The Lamentation of Christ by Hans Memling, inv. no. 2471 (OK)

In 1936, the painting The Lamentation of Christ by Hans Memling was owned by Arthur Goldschmidt, a Jewish art dealer who had fled from Germany and whose name is associated with the trade in spoliated art. Goldschmidt settled at the Place Vendôme in Paris in 1936, together with Paul Graupe, another art dealer from Berlin. After the occupation of Paris by the Germans in 1940, their commercial inventory was confiscated and Goldschmidt was imprisoned. He was released after six months, after which he travelled via Spain to Havana (Cuba), where he continued his art trade. It is unknown from whom and when Goldschmidt acquired the painting The Lamentation of Christ. At least until 1917, it was owned by Richard von Kaufmann in Berlin. In 1936, the painting was bought from Goldschmidt by D.G. van Beuningen. As a part of his collection, it ended up in the museum in 1958.