Win a trip to Jeff Koons' studio

Jeff Koons, Baroque Egg with Bow (Orange/Magenta), 1994-2008, chromium stainless steel with transparant color coating, 212.1 x 196.9 x 152.4 cm (6,4 m3). Bert Kreuk Collection. Photo: Femke Hoogland Jeff Koons, Baroque Egg with Bow (Orange/Magenta), 1994-2008, chromium stainless steel with transparant color coating, 212.1 x 196.9 x 152.4 cm (6,4 m3). Bert Kreuk Collection. Photo: Femke Hoogland

Press release

Win a trip to Jeff Koons’ studio

Around Easter visitors to Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen have a chance to win a trip to the studio of world-famous artist Jeff Koons in New York. The competition is linked to the giant Easter egg, Baroque Egg with Bow (Orange/Magenta) by Jeff Koons now on display in Rotterdam.

Museums all around the world were queuing up to a exhibit the immense glistening orange ‘Ester egg’ with an orange bow, ‘Baroque Egg with Bow (Orange/Magenta)’ (1994-2008) by artist Jeff Koons (1955). However, the owner of the work chose Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen because of his special connection with the museum and Rotterdam. The egg weighs 2000 kilos, is worth millions of euros and will remain on display in the museum’s entrance area for the rest of the year.

Competition
Until 9 April visitors to Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen have a chance to get a glimpse inside Jeff Koons’ studio in New York. The winner of this city break will also attend an evening auction at Sotheby’s, at which costly works such as that of Jeff Koons will be sold. Just like in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, museum visitors are asked to write why they would like to visit the studio of one of the world’s most famous contemporary artists. On Tuesday 10 April three cards will be drawn. The person with the best motivation will win the all-expenses-paid trip.

Jeff Koons
Koons is well known for his huge objects such as gigantic rabbits and cherubs leading a fattened pig. Art works such as these have made Koons among the best-paid artists in the world. He is a master at enlarging everyday objects to enormous proportions. His ‘new Pop Art’ works are uncritical enlargements of consumer society, fusing high and low culture in objects that are simultaneously enticing and überkitsch. His New York studio with more than eight staff calls to mind Andy Warhol’s Factory in the 1960s.

Celebration Series
The ten gigantic eggs by Jeff Koons are part of his famous ‘Celebration Series’, which he began in 1994. Five of the eggs have a smooth surface and are known as the ‘Smooth Eggs’. The remaining five are called ‘Baroque Eggs’ and look as if they are wrapped in crumpled foil. At first sight the subject seems banal, but is symbolic of (re)birth and fertility, recurring themes in the artist’s work. The coating of the eggs is applied by hand, layer upon layer, to achieve a glistening effect. This technique is borrowed from the car industry. Koons has made ten eggs in fourteen years. Each egg has been worked on for several years by a team of assistants. They are all in important private collections such as those of François Pinault and Damien Hirst. None of the eggs is in a museum collection. Other famous sculptures from the ‘Celebration Series’ include ‘Balloon Dog’, ‘Hanging Heart’ and ‘Diamond’. The ‘Celebration Series’, which also includes oil paintings, has been exhibited at the Palace of Versailles near Paris, the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, and on the roof of the Metropolitan Museum in New York. All the works in the ‘Celebration Series’ have been honed to technical perfection.

With thanks to the Bert Kreuk Collection and the studio of Jeff Koons. The competition has been made possible by Sotheby’s auctioneers.

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