New: Peanut-Butter Platform by Wim T. Schippers

Wim T. Schippers, Peanut-Butter Platform 1962-201, Galerie Mickery Loenersloot, 1969, Photocredit: Galerie A Original caption of: Wim T. Schippers, Peanut-Butter Platform 1962-201, Galerie Mickery Loenersloot, 1969, Photocredit: Galerie A

Press release

New: Peanut-Butter Platform
13 January 2011

Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen has acquired the notorious Peanut-Butter Platform (1962-2010) by Wim T. Schippers. The installation has an illustrious history and is the perfect complement to several other conceptual floor sculptures in the museum’s collection.

Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen acquired Peanut-Butter Platform last December and will exhibit the work publicly from 5 March 2011. This work by Wim T. Schippers (1942) can be installed at any size and depth and consists of a sort of frame containing peanut butter of any brand. The museum is delighted by this new acquisition by the maker of ‘Het Is Me Wat’ (‘And Now what’s Up’), better known as the floating stone, and several other works in the collection.

Different versions
Schippers first installed the Peanut-Butter Platform in 1969 at Galerie Mickery in Loenersloot. It was also shown at the Centraal Museum in Utrecht during a retrospective exhibition of Schippers’ work in 1997. This will be the first time that the work has been seen in Rotterdam.

Floating stone and green eggs
This work by Wim T. Schippers complements other conceptual floor works in the collection, such as ‘A Computer Which Will Solve Every Problem in the World / 3-12 Polygon’ (1984) by Walter de Maria 1984 and ‘The Well Polished Floor Sculpture’ (1969-1980) by Ger van Elk. Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen has several works by Wim T. Schippers including various works on paper, the floating stone ‘Het Is Me Wat’ (1999) and a white carpet with green eggs from 1966.

Wim T. Schippers
Peanut-Butter Floor is an excellent example of Wim T. Schippers’ conceptual oeuvre. His wide-ranging work as a visual artist, radio and television performer and playwright is characterised by the principle that meaning is to be found in the most senseless of phenomena. He has supplied the voices of Ernie, Kermit the Frog, Guy Smiley and Count Von Count for the Dutch version of Sesame Street since 1976.

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